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The Divine Miss M [userpic]
This Day in History - Politics
by The Divine Miss M (mightyafrodite)

April 3, 1721 Robert Walpole becomes the first Prime Minister of Britain, though without the actual title.

Walpole was a British Whig statesman, considered to the first holder of the office of prime minister, who dominated politics in the reigns of George I and George II.

Robert Walpole was born on 26 August 1676 in Houghton, Norfolk into a wealthy landowning family. He was educated at Cambridge University and in 1701 became member of parliament for Castle Rising in Norfolk, where his father had previously been MP. He rose rapidly, becoming a member of the Admiralty Board, secretary of war and, in 1709, treasurer of the navy. His rise was temporarily halted by the Tories, who came into power in 1710. In 1712, they accused him of corruption and he was briefly imprisoned.

In 1714, George I came to the throne. George distrusted the Tories, whom he believed opposed his right to the throne, and as a result the Whigs were in the ascendant again. In 1715, Walpole became first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the exchequer. He resigned in 1717 after disagreements within his party but in 1720 was made paymaster general. He avoided the scandal that surrounded the collapse of the South Sea Company and was subsequently appointed first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the exchequer again. In this position he effectively became prime minister, although the term was not used at the time. He remained in this position of dominance until 1742.

Walpole consolidated Whig power through a system of royal patronage. He pursued a policy of peace abroad, low taxation and reducing the national debt and he knew the importance of keeping parliament on his side. He was also accused of bribery and corruption in his efforts to retain power. After George I's death in 1727, Walpole was briefly superseded by George II's favourite, Spencer Compton, but succeeded in returning himself to favour, partly through the support of the new queen, Caroline. In 1735, George II made Walpole a gift of 10 Downing Street, now the permanent London residence of the British prime minister.

Opposition eventually began to develop within Walpole's own party, and a trade dispute with Spain was used by his critics to force him to declare war in 1739, known as the War of Jenkins' Ear. A poor general election result in 1741 made his position more unstable. A number of Whig politicians opposed Walpole's conduct of the war and he resigned in February 1742. He was created earl of Orford in the same year and continued to maintain influence over George II. Walpole died on 18 March 1745.

This entry (minus the links) taken from BBC's history database.

For more information on Sir Robert Walpole, check out the following links:
Official Website of the Prime Minister - Walpole entry
Houghton Hall - Walpole's residence
Secretary at War - A history of the office

The Divine Miss M [userpic]
Today In History - Literature
by The Divine Miss M (mightyafrodite)
at April 2nd, 2011 (04:08 pm)

April 2, 1805: Hans Christian Andersen is born

Hans Christian Andersen, one of the world's greatest storytellers, is born in Odensk, near Copenhagen.

During Andersen's boyhood, his father died, and the child went to work in a factory briefly. However, he showed great talent for languages and entered the University of Copenhagen in 1828. The following year, he published his literary spoof A Walk from Amager*, which became his first important work.

Andersen wrote several plays that flopped, but he achieved some success with his novel The Improviser [or The Improvisatore] (1835). Meanwhile, he entertained himself by writing a series of children's stories that he published as collections. The first, Tales Told for Children [or Fairy Tales, Told for Children] (1835), included "The Princess and the Pea." Andersen released new collections every year or two for decades as he traveled widely in Europe, Africa, and Asia Minor. His stories include "The Ugly Duckling," "The Little Mermaid," and "The Emperor's New Clothes." He died in 1875 at age 70.

This entry is courtesy of History.com.



For more information on Hans Christian Andersen, his works, and publications on this important figure in the world of literature, check out the following links:

The Literature Network
The Books Factory

*Also known as A Journey on Foot from Holmen's Canal to the East Point of Amager and A Walking Tour from the Holmen Canal to the Eastern Point of the Amager

The Divine Miss M [userpic]
Undug After Soooooo Long
by The Divine Miss M (mightyafrodite)
at April 2nd, 2011 (02:49 pm)

Hey, everyone...community creator here. I must apologize for my neglect of this community. I won't waste your time getting into specifics, but life intervened in one way or another. I aim to put my time into the community once again, in the hopes that we can get regular participation. If you have any comments, suggestions, or questions about taking the community in a given direction, I plan on setting up a post specifically for such a discussion.

At the moment, I prefer to keep the community open to anything pertaining to the discipline: book reviews/recommendations, article discussions, issues related to teaching and studying history, and of course history itself.

There are a couple of ideas I have for keeping content flowing, one of which is to ask for volunteers, between whom we'd divide responsibility for posting content once a month. It would be divided into regions. If enough people volunteer, we can further divide the responsibility by period. Though we may do some tweaking with the system (changing division of regions, for example), I'd like to see how much interest there is before doing anything more. This effort will generate steady content, and hopefully discussion, aside from "this day in history" posts and general member entries.

Proposed Regions
US & Canada (w/ Greenland)
Mexico
Central America & Caribbean
South America
Western Europe
Eastern Europe
Russia
North Africa & the Middle East (w/ Turkey)
Central Asia
SE Asia (w/ Indonesia)
South Asia
East Asia
Australia, New Zealand & Tazmania
Pacific Islands

I hope everyone is having a wonderful 2011!

unquietsoul5 [userpic]
Whats Wrong With the Wisconsin Republicans?
by unquietsoul5 (unquietsoul5)
at February 28th, 2011 (09:25 pm)

Well it might have to do with the precedent that their anti-Union approach mimics:





"We must close union offices, confiscate their money and put their leaders in prison. We must reduce workers' salaries and take away their right to strike."


Adolph Hitler, May 2 1933

heroditus [userpic]
Confederate History in Virginia: Let's Do a Real Assessment
by heroditus (heroditus)
at April 21st, 2010 (12:16 am)

As Texas begins to re-write its text books, Virgina can be counted on to provide focus to the historical debate. Shockingly, I agree. We need to have a Confederate History month were a reassessment of the social and historical events of that period led to the War of the Rebellion, as it was officially called. So let's assess those cherished days of antebellum glory!

It is at this time a fellow blogger, Fred Clark, has reminded me of the words of Frederick Douglas quoted below:

I find, since reading over the foregoing Narrative, that I have, in several instances, spoken in such a tone and manner, respecting religion, as may possibly lead those unacquainted with my religious views to suppose me an opponent of all religion. To remove the liability of such misapprehension, I deem it proper to append the following brief explanation.

What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the slaveholding religion of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference -- so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other.

I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land. Indeed, I can see no reason, but the most deceitful one, for calling the religion of this land Christianity. I look upon it as the climax of all misnomers, the boldest of all frauds, and the grossest of all libels. Never was there a clearer case of "stealing the livery of the court of heaven to serve the devil in."

I am filled with unutterable loathing when I contemplate the religious pomp and show, together with the horrible inconsistencies, which everywhere surround me. We have men-stealers for ministers, women-whippers for missionaries, and cradle-plunderers for church members. The man who wields the blood-clotted cowskin during the week fills the pulpit on Sunday, and claims to be a minister of the meek and lowly Jesus. The man who robs me of my earnings at the end of each week meets me as a class-leader on Sunday morning, to show me the way of life, and the path of salvation. He who sells my sister, for purposes of prostitution, stands forth as the pious advocate of purity. He who proclaims it a religious duty to read the Bible denies me the right of learning to read the name of the God who made me. He who is the religious advocate of marriage robs whole millions of its sacred influence, and leaves them to the ravages of wholesale pollution.

The warm defender of the sacredness of the family relation is the same that scatters whole families -- sundering husbands and wives, parents and children, sisters and brothers -- leaving the hut vacant and the hearth desolate. We see the thief preaching against theft, and the adulterer against adultery. We have men sold to build churches, women sold to support the gospel, and babes sold to purchase Bibles for the poor heathen! All for the glory of God and the good of souls!

The slave auctioneer's bell and the church-going bell chime in with each other, and the bitter cries of the heart-broken slave are drowned in the religious shouts of his pious master. Revivals of religion and revivals in the slave-trade go hand in hand together. The slave prison and the church stand near each other. The clanking of fetters and the rattling of chains in the prison, and the pious psalm and solemn prayer in the church, may be heard at the same time. The dealers in the bodies and souls of men erect their stand in the presence of the pulpit, and they mutually help each other. The dealer gives his blood-stained gold to support the pulpit, and the pulpit, in return, covers his infernal business with the garb of Christianity. Here we have religion and robbery the allies of each other -- devils dressed in angels' robes, and hell presenting the semblance of paradise.

Appendix, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 1845

I think Douglas says it all. Let's read about the heroes like Jefferson Davis, and Robert E. Lee and the reasons for their struggle, to be allowed to enslave another entire population. No matter how heroic, noble, well respected the former fighters of that rebellion were, WE CANNOT FORGET THAT THEY WERE FIGHTING FOR SLAVERY. Now they won't say that directly. They will say no we fought for "STATES RIGHTS". But that is a pseudonym for "the states right to choose to be a slave state."

So let us re-read the heroic narratives of the old south. However, it must be done in combination with Frederick Douglas, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington, and William Lloyd Garrison. These are the faces of the struggle to make all people free in America. And the fight still goes on today. To selectively eliminate the importance of slavery would be akin to stating the War of the Rebellion never happened.


As Texas begins to re-write its text books, Virgina can be counted on to provide focus to the historical debate. Shockingly, I agree. We need to have a Confederate History month were a reassessment of the social and historical events of that period led to the War of the Rebellion, as it was officially called. So let's assess those cherished days of antebellum glory!

It is at this time a fellow blogger, Fred Clark, has reminded me of the words of Frederick Douglas quoted below:


I find, since reading over the foregoing Narrative, that I have, in several instances, spoken in such a tone and manner, respecting religion, as may possibly lead those unacquainted with my religious views to suppose me an opponent of all religion. To remove the liability of such misapprehension, I deem it proper to append the following brief explanation.

What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the slaveholding religion of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference -- so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other.

I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land. Indeed, I can see no reason, but the most deceitful one, for calling the religion of this land Christianity. I look upon it as the climax of all misnomers, the boldest of all frauds, and the grossest of all libels. Never was there a clearer case of "stealing the livery of the court of heaven to serve the devil in."

I am filled with unutterable loathing when I contemplate the religious pomp and show, together with the horrible inconsistencies, which everywhere surround me. We have men-stealers for ministers, women-whippers for missionaries, and cradle-plunderers for church members. The man who wields the blood-clotted cowskin during the week fills the pulpit on Sunday, and claims to be a minister of the meek and lowly Jesus. The man who robs me of my earnings at the end of each week meets me as a class-leader on Sunday morning, to show me the way of life, and the path of salvation. He who sells my sister, for purposes of prostitution, stands forth as the pious advocate of purity. He who proclaims it a religious duty to read the Bible denies me the right of learning to read the name of the God who made me. He who is the religious advocate of marriage robs whole millions of its sacred influence, and leaves them to the ravages of wholesale pollution.

The warm defender of the sacredness of the family relation is the same that scatters whole families -- sundering husbands and wives, parents and children, sisters and brothers -- leaving the hut vacant and the hearth desolate. We see the thief preaching against theft, and the adulterer against adultery. We have men sold to build churches, women sold to support the gospel, and babes sold to purchase Bibles for the poor heathen! All for the glory of God and the good of souls!

The slave auctioneer's bell and the church-going bell chime in with each other, and the bitter cries of the heart-broken slave are drowned in the religious shouts of his pious master. Revivals of religion and revivals in the slave-trade go hand in hand together. The slave prison and the church stand near each other. The clanking of fetters and the rattling of chains in the prison, and the pious psalm and solemn prayer in the church, may be heard at the same time. The dealers in the bodies and souls of men erect their stand in the presence of the pulpit, and they mutually help each other. The dealer gives his blood-stained gold to support the pulpit, and the pulpit, in return, covers his infernal business with the garb of Christianity. Here we have religion and robbery the allies of each other -- devils dressed in angels' robes, and hell presenting the semblance of paradise.

Appendix, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 1845

I think Douglas says it all. Let's read about the heroes like Jefferson Davis, and Robert E. Lee and the reasons for their struggle, to be allowed to enslave another entire population. No matter how heroic, noble, well respected the former fighters of that rebellion were, WE CANNOT FORGET THAT THEY WERE FIGHTING FOR SLAVERY. Now they won't say that directly. They will say no we fought for "STATES RIGHTS". But that is a pseudonym for "the states right to choose to be a slave state."

So let us re-read the heroic narratives of the old south. However, it must be done in combination with Frederick Douglas, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington, and William Lloyd Garrison. These are the faces of the struggle to make all people free in America. And the fight still goes on today. To selectively eliminate the importance of slavery would be akin to stating the War of the Rebellion never happened.









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VL [userpic]
Smashing the Atlantic Wall
by VL (elfbiter)
at June 18th, 2009 (01:10 pm)

Patrick Delaforce - Smashing the Atlantic Wall
Logistics on the back of the BulgeCollapse )

The thoughts of Priscamor [userpic]
Today in Strangeness:
by The thoughts of Priscamor (priscamor)
at January 9th, 2009 (07:03 am)

On this day in 1493, while sailing near the Dominican Republic, Christopher Columbus described seeing three "mermaids" who were "not half as beautiful as they are painted." In reality, he was actually observing manatees! In 1643, Giovanni Riccioli first reported the elusive phenomenon known as the Ashen Light of Venus, a faint luminescence on the night side of our sister planet.

Secret Services (three parts). Part I. "Welcome to slavery!"
by krylovskiy (krylovskiy)
at September 6th, 2008 (04:10 am)

Vladimir Krylovskiy,
the editor of the Russian Orthodox
journal "Rodnik" ("Spring"),
New-York.

7314 21-st Ave, # 4-D
Brooklyn, NY, 11204
ph. (718) 256-8024


To whom it may concern

Dear Sir or Madam,
There are two documents below which I would like to suggest your attention. The information expounded in them is unique. It is very seldom people dare to speak in public on topics like this. The fear of all-powerful Secret Services stops them. Secret Services many times demonstrated their total impunity and irrepressible aspiration to come out of the public control. I am grateful the Lord who has helped me to get the better of that fear.
”TheCollapse )

Secret Services (three parts). Part II. "Who hath ears to hear, let him hear".
by krylovskiy (krylovskiy)
at September 6th, 2008 (04:05 am)

"W H O H A T H E A R S T O H E A R , L E T H I M H E A R..." *

"Of whom a man is overcome,
of the same is he brought in bounge"
(2Pet. 1,29)

What is a rear sight shooting? Everybody knows. It is a shooting when one chooses an aim among several ones placed not so far each from other, then he is taking a careful sight and... Right! Meanwhile, since telescopic sights started to be used, a rear sight shooting became to be an accuracy itself.
Do you think it is possible to hit a person being in the in the crowd or in one place with some other people with gasiform poison gas (PG)? It turned out that it is possible.
Collapse )

Secret Services (three parts). Part III. "The advices to a Human-Rights defender".
by krylovskiy (krylovskiy)
at September 6th, 2008 (04:01 am)

T h e a d v i c e s t o a H u m a n - R i g h t s d e f e n d e r

- It is necessary to remember that the person who has appealed for help is already not able to protect himself. He is really sick since he is being influenced with PG aiming affecting the central nervous system of a human being. Any actions which require to be considered carefully cost him much efforts including the very conversation with the Human-Rights defender. Because of that he needs to be treated with great solicitude. It is necessary at once to let him understand that now he is not alone in his situation, that he is sure to be protected and to persuade him that it is true.
However, the Human-Rights defender has to remember that as soon as he has gone deeply into the person's position, considered it carefully, and is going to protect him, ”heCollapse )